Camellia Sinsensis, Green & Black Tea

0

Posted by John Minton | Posted in Plants | Posted on 27-05-2011

Tags: , ,

Camellia Sinensis is one of the primary plants that we get (green and black) tea from. There are a few variations of tea plants but C. Sinensis is the “garden size” one growing to 6 feet tall, while other variations can grow in excess of 10 feet or more in the form of a tree. Camellia Sinensis ranges from shrub to bush and has fragrant white flowers with yellow centers. Camellia Sinensis likes full sun and moisture so don’t dry the soil out. It’s definitely a slow grower and it also has a dormant period in the Winter. When Spring comes around it will start to bud and grow new leaves at the top of the branches. These new growths are what we use to make tea. Camellia Sinensis will grow fruit containing seeds, if planted they will grow. If you plan on harvesting tea from plants grown from seed it can take 3 years or more to grow a plant big enough to harvest from.

Read the rest of this entry »





Lonicera Japonica, Japanese Honeysuckle, Halls Honeysuckle

0

Posted by John Minton | Posted in Plants | Posted on 21-05-2011

Tags: , , , ,

Lonicera Japonica is commonly known as Halls Japanese Honeysuckle. It’s an invasive, med-fast growing vine that flowers from Spring to Summer with white and yellow flowers. Unlike most plants whose flowers are all one color per plant, the flowers on this Honeysuckle are entirely white or yellow, it’s a really neat attribute (see the picture for example). While there are numerous variety of Lonicera/Honeysuckle, Lonicera Japonica is probably the most common, especially in my area.

In the Spring when Lonicera Japonica is in full bloom, you can smell it from hundreds of feet away, the distinct taste of honey floats from the flowers through the air and attracts thousands of bees and all the humming birds in the area.

Read the rest of this entry »





Jasminum Multiflorum, Downy Jasmine, Indian Jasmine

0

Posted by John Minton | Posted in Plants | Posted on 18-05-2011

Tags: , , , ,

Jasminum Multiflorum is a true Jasmine with 8 lobed white flowers and is very fragrant! If grown in good conditions the star shaped flowers can sometimes cover the entire plant, leaving very few leaves visible. Jasminum Multiflorum smells pleasant, slightly similar to Jasminum Tortuosum and is strong. Many people incorrectly refer to Jasminum Multiflorum as “Star Jasmine”, when in fact if this were true every Jasmine would be called a “Star Jasmine”.

Read the rest of this entry »





Popular Star Jasmine Varieties

0

Posted by John Minton | Posted in Plants | Posted on 14-05-2011

Tags: , , ,

The common name “Star Jasmine” typically refers to Trachelospermum Jasminoides, a Jasmine-like plant. But often the term Star Jasmine means any Jasmine-like plant. Here is a list of Jasmine (Jasminum) or Jasmine-like (False Jasmine) plants that are commonly known as Star Jasmine.

 

 

Read the rest of this entry »





Jasminum Mesnyi, Japanese Jasmine, Primrose Jasmine

0

Posted by John Minton | Posted in Plants | Posted on 11-05-2011

Tags: , ,

Jasminum Mesnyi is one of the true Yellow Jasmine. One of the local nurseries has a Jasminum Mesnyi that has been grown into more of a tree with roots grown around a large rock, of all the Jasmine varieties I’ve seen this one has the best Bonsai uses. While most websites report Jasminum Mesnyi as being fragrant, I do not smell even the slightest hint of fragrance…maybe I hit it at the wrong time, after a rain perhaps. New growth is soft but becomes woody after a season. Jasminum Mesnyi with its strong woody base and lack of fragrance is clearly more of an ornamental plant.

Read the rest of this entry »





Lilac, Syringa

0

Posted by John Minton | Posted in Plants | Posted on 11-05-2011

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Lilac is a neat plant, it can grow like a bush or a tree, comes in a variety of colors and is fragrant! The most common colors of Lilac are shades varying from purple to blue, though most that I’ve seen are purple. I have also seen red, white and even yellow Lilacs! The varying species of Lilac also tend to have varying levels of fragrance, though they all tend to smell similar there are some subtle differences.

Read the rest of this entry »